Monthly Archives: June 2015

Japanese style tansu bench with knock down joinery

https://teamwomenmn.org/formatting/hannah-smith-walker-thesis/23/ https://lawdegree.com/questions/creative-writing-university-of-new-mexico/46/ is viagra good for bph immigration research paper example timolol viagra black albino sheep essay https://homemods.org/usc/autism-essay/46/ dostinex for women cialis 100 mg ne kadar a short essay on female education https://mindworkspsychology.org/treat/buy-neurontin-800mg-no-prescription/70/ 1500 word essay length double spaced click here creative writing novel course levitra flavio palco mp3 rap enter e marketing ppt papers marketing project starting a introduction in an essay cheap best essay ghostwriter sites for phd growth hair proscar generic viagra 2019 https://sdchirogroup.com/savings/cialis-y-vitamina-e/33/ source url https://smartfin.org/science/generic-brand-of-cymbalta/12/ activity theory of aging essay topics https://energy-analytics-institute.org/freefeatures/arbeitsplan-promotion-beispiel-essay/56/ essays narrative writing cymbalta clenched jaw behaviour management primary classrooms essay glucocorticoids buy uk Tansu is a Japanese word for furniture cabinet, and I like to make this piece using knock down joinery. With knock down joinery, the whole case can be assembled and disassembled by one person and without tools. The Japanese style adheres closely to the idea that form follows function, as well as understated design and careful attention to proportion and line. The following pictures will take you through the assembly steps, beginning with a bit of cabinetmaker humor.

From chaos to order: the tansu bench deconstructed. Here are all the components, including rails, side panels, doors and more.

From chaos to order: the tansu bench deconstructed. Here are all the components, including rails, side panels, doors and more.

 

To assemble the tansu I connect the two lower rails with the center connector. They are joined with mortise and tenon, but no glue.

To assemble the tansu I connect the two lower rails with the center connector. They are joined with mortise and tenon, but no glue.

 

The right shelf panel slides into grooves cut on the inside faces of the rails.

The right shelf panel slides into grooves cut on the inside faces of the rails.

Next, the thru tenons on the lower rails are positioned in line with the lower mortises in the right side panel.

Next, the thru tenons on the lower rails are positioned in line with the lower mortises in the right side panel.

The tenons on the lower rail assembly slide easily into the mortises.

The tenons on the lower rail assembly slide easily into the mortises.

Here's a closer view of the thru tenon and mortise. The rabbeted edges of the panel are housed in the grooves in the rails with enough extra space to permit seasonal wood movement.

Here’s a closer view of the thru tenon and mortise. The rabbeted edges of the panel are housed in the grooves in the rails with enough extra space to permit seasonal wood movement.

The upper rails are joined with a connector in the same way.

The upper rails are joined with a connector in the same way.

The top panel is shown fitted into the upper rails.

The top panel is shown fitted into the upper rails.

Both sets of rails with the right side panels inserted are fitted into the mortises on the right side panel.

Both sets of rails with the right side panels inserted are fitted into the mortises on the right side panel.

Here's a close-up view of the thru tenon and mortise on the upper rail.

Here’s a close-up view of the thru tenon and mortise on the upper rail.

Next, the center support post is fitted into the top and bottom rail connectors without glue. Placing the center support post inside the cabinet eliminates the need for a visible supports attached to the upper and lower rails and ensures there is no deflection of the rails when people sit down on the bench.

Next, the center support post is fitted into the top and bottom rail connectors without glue. Placing the center support post inside the cabinet eliminates the need for a visible supports attached to the upper and lower rails and ensures there is no deflection of the rails when people sit down on the bench.

Now the top and bottom panels on the left are in place.

Now the top and bottom panels on the left are in place.

The back, which is a frame and panel construction, slides into place.

The back, which is a frame and panel construction, slides into place.

Here is the left side panel fitted to the thru tenons on all four rails.

Here is the left side panel fitted to the thru tenons on all four rails.

This is another view of the side panel being fitted to the thru tenons on the four rails.

This is another view of the side panel being fitted to the thru tenons on the four rails.

This is a view of the assembled bench. Note the mortises in the thru tenons where the tusks are to be inserted.

This is a view of the assembled bench. Note the mortises in the thru tenons where the tusks are to be inserted.

Here is the complete chest with the sliding doors in place and the tusks inserted in the thru tenons. This makes for an incredibly strong joint that holds the case square though all manner of use.

Here is the complete chest with the sliding doors in place and the tusks inserted in the thru tenons. This makes for an incredibly strong joint that holds the case square though all manner of use.

 

This is another view of the thru tenon with the tusk in place.

This is another view of the thru tenon with the tusk in place.

This is a view of the back of the tansu. The frame and panel construction of the rear panel is both strong and lightweight. With a finished back, this tansu can be used in a furniture grouping in the middle of a room.

This is a view of the back of the tansu. The frame and panel construction of the rear panel is both strong and lightweight. With a finished back, this tansu can be used in a furniture grouping in the middle of a room.

Here's the finished tansu bench, 55"(W) x 17"(H) x 20"(D).  The doors slide in grooves and lift out as needed. It takes about fifteen minutes to assemble. No tools.

Here’s the finished tansu bench, 55″(W) x 17″(H) x 20″(D). The doors slide in grooves and lift out as needed. It takes about fifteen minutes to assemble. No tools.

 

So, there you have it. A versatile tansu bench with generous storage. It works well in the entry area of a house, at the foot of the bed or as a table in front of a sofa. The natural finish allows the cherry to darken over time and to develop a rich patina.

Thanks for visiting my blog!

 

 

 

Using a rabbet plane

A rabbet plane makes quick work of sizing a panel to fit snugly in the frame. The panel is not glued so it can expand and contract with changes in temperature and humidity. This Japanese rabbet plane works on the pull stroke.

A Japanese rabbet plane

A Japanese rabbet plane

Underside of a rabbet plane showing the adjustable fence.

Underside of a rabbet plane showing the adjustable fence.

A rabbet plane makes quick work of sizing the panel so it fits snugly in the frame.

A rabbet plane makes quick work of sizing the panel so it fits snugly in the frame.

This is a view of the panel inserted in the frame.

This is a view of the panel inserted in the frame.